ACLU Alleges Widespread Voting Rights Problems In Native Communities

In its new report entitled "Voting Rights In Indian Country", the American Civil Liberties Union states that Native Americans continue to face a a variety of discriminatory election practices, including: at large elections; redistricting plans that diluted Native American voting strength; the failure to comply with one person, one vote; unfounded allegations of election fraud on Indian reservations; discriminatory voter registration procedures; onerous identification requirements for voting; the lack of minority language assistance in voting; and the refusal to comply with the preclearance provisions of Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act.  The report's findings are based on the ACLU's investigations conducted for voting rights litigation cases in Colorado, Montana, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming.

The report recounts a litany of abuses endured by Native communities throughout the 19th and 20th Centuries, and draws a line of impact to the present day.

One consequence is a depressed socio-economic status that limits the ability of tribal members to participate effectively in local, state, and national elections and to enforce the anti-discrimination provisions of the Voting Rights Act and other federal laws protecting minority voting rights. Voting is significantly polarized along racial lines, and little meaningful interaction exists between the Indian and non-Indian communities, especially in the towns and communities that border the reservations. This lack of interaction and access to the majority community makes it very difficult for Indians to elect candidates of their choice to office in jurisdictions in which they are a numerical minority.

Indian political participation is further diminished by the disproportionate number of tribal members disfranchised for commission of criminal offenses. There is a pattern of racial profiling of Indians by law enforcement officers, the targeting of Indians for prosecution of serious crimes, and the imposition of lengthier prison sentences upon Indian defendants. These injustices result in the higher incarceration of Indians and dilute the overall voting strength of Indian communities.

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Yvonne L. Swan - November 2, 2009 4:38 PM

I am not a lawyer, merely an advocate for rights of prisoners. I am trying to help a Blackfeet couple get their 25-year-old son out of Montana State Prison, but it seems hopeless. From reading documents I am convinced he is innocent and was targeted for prosecution of two separate/but overlapped serious crimes of rape. He's been imprisoned for four years when the judge did not sentence him to prison. Indian prisoners tell me the state of Montana forces Indians to stay in prison longer than non-Indians because the prison gets MORE MONEY FOR INDIAN INMATES. This is why there is a higher incarceration of Indians in Monana and possibly other states. I would like an investigation into this matter. What can I do to assist? Thank you.

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