Tribal Agreement With Boeing Produces $2 Million For Environmental Cleanup Of Ancestral Duwamish Waterway

Duwamish River Bank Near Seattle

To resolve a multi-party federal lawsuit, the Boeing Company will pay $2 million to remediate environmental damage in Seattle’s Duwamish waterway, the ancestral grounds for the Duwamish, Muckleshoot, and Suquamish Tribes. Joining as plaintiffs with several federal and state agencies, the Muckleshoot and Suquamish brought the suit to fund the cleanup of the site where Boeing built many of the B-17 bombers used during World War II. Solvents, oils and other chemicals polluted the property and leached into groundwater that migrated to the Duwamish waterway.

Boeing has agreed to undertake two habitat-restoration projects to benefit salmon and birds. The company will create nearly five acres of new wetlands, restore a half-mile of waterway, and establish a holding area for young salmon. It also will demolish several buildings that were partially constructed on pilings over the waterway during the 1930s and early 1940s. "We'll be taking the pilings out and restoring the bank," said Blythe Jameson, a spokeswoman for Boeing.

In addition to the Tribes, the settlement resolves claims against Boeing by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Department of Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Washington State Department of Ecology, and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife. The agreement includes the creation of a permanent stewardship fund for the remediation projects. Boeing says cleanup and restoration activities are scheduled to begin in 2012, and will take several years to complete.
 

Duwamish Federal Recognition Hearings Underway

Duwamish Tribal Dancers

Duwamish Tribal leaders and Rep. Jim McDermott will testify before the U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources this week, seeking federal recognition for the Tribe. The Duwamish Tribe’s ancestral homeland is located in present-day Seattle, which takes its name from the Tribe’s legendary Chief Si’ahl.

The Duwamish were signatories to the Treaty of Point Elliott in 1855, which guaranteed fishing rights and reservations for all Tribes who were party to the agreement.  However, in 1916 the construction of the ship canal connecting Lake Washington to Puget Sound ultimately forced the Duwamish to leave their traditional territory and move to places like the Muckleshoot and Tulalip reservations.

In the closing hours of President Bill Clinton's administration the Duwamish were granted federal recognition but that decision was reversed by President George Bush's administration. A Bush appointee decided that that the Tribal members no longer exist as a distinct political and social unit, primarily because of what administration officials characterized as a lapse in Tribal government and social cohesion from 1916 to 1925. The Duwamish's approximately 600 members have since sued the U.S. Department of Interior to reverse its ruling and restore federal recognition.

The website for the House Committee on Natural Resources will have a link to video footage of the hearings after their completion.