Major Tribal Construction Seminar, 10-11 March 2011 in Albuquerque

(Indianz.com)

Tribal construction and infrastructure project development involve a unique set of issues.  Law Seminars International is presenting a two-day symposium at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico on March 10-11 covering topics that will facilitate construction and development in Tribal communities.

Topics to be covered include:

• Updates on tribal construction funding and financing programs
• Making effective use of economic development bonds
• Setting up the best project delivery methods
• Drafting contract documents
• Federal construction programs
• Making effective use of economic development bonds
• Tribes as contractors
• Structuring business relationships
• TERO compliance programs
• NEPA review for non-tribal facilities
• Liability and financial risk management for tribes
• Effective supervision and dispute resolution

The distinguished faculty includes experts from across the nation including : 

  • Don Chapman, Sr. Advisor, Native American Affairs, U.S. Department of Commerce
  • John Rever, P.E., Director, Facilities, Environment and Cultural Resources, DOI
  • Terry Brunner, New Mexico State Director, U.S. Department of Agriculture
  • Marlin Knight, Native American Program Specialist, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development
  • W. Gregory Guedel, Foster Pepper Native American Group Chair and Chair of the American Bar Association’s Native American Concerns Committee

Program details and registration are available HERE

Congress Seeks $2 Billion For Tribal Economic Development Bonds

The House and Senate are closing in on final draft legislation that would authorize the issuance by Tribes of up to $2 Billion worth of tax-exempt government bonds for economic development projects. The provisions are included in the “American Recovery and Reinvestment Tax Act of 2009” (H.R. 598) sponsored by Representative Charles Rangel of New York, a broad package of stimulus measures and tax credits designed to spur public infrastructure works and economic growth throughout the country.

Section 1532 of the Bill provides for federal support to “Indian Tribal governments” to issue up to $2 Billion in tax-exempt “Tribal economic development bonds”. The bonds will pay interest to investors who purchase them, but that interest will not be subject to federal taxes. The revenue generated by Tribes through the sale of these bonds may be used to provide capital for Tribal infrastructure projects and essential governmental functions. Tribes will not be permitted to apply such revenues to “any portion of a building in which class II or class III gaming is conducted”, nor for “any facility located outside the Indian reservation”.

The use of tax-exempt bonds by Tribal governments has increased significantly in recent years, as they provide both needed capital for Tribes and are attractive securities for tax-conscious investors. If signed by the President and fully implemented, H.R. 598 will provide significant assistance to Native communities in accessing capital markets for development projects in 2009.

Obama Put To Early Test By Tribes

The new Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar recently told Tribal leaders in Washington D.C. that "First Americans will have their place at the table in the Obama administration."  Less than 24 hours after President Obama took office, Tribes throughout America have put that policy to the test.

The Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, which represents 20 Tribes in the Pacific Northwest including the Tulalip, Stillaguamish, and Sauk Suiattle, submitted a 16-page request to President Obama for additional funding and the adoption of a formal policy supporting Tribal management of natural resources. The Commission's request also seeks:

1. The issuance of an Executive Order reaffirming the government-to-government relationship between Tribes and the US government.

2. An additional $12 million per year in funding for the Commission and an extra $4.5 million per year for the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission.

3. Restoration of expansive water rights to Tribes; and

4. Enhanced legal protections for Tribal resources such as salmon and shellfish.

The Commission’s requests were followed closely by a letter to the President from a group of US Senators representing Native constituencies throughout the country, seeking significant new funding for infrastructure and social/educational programs in Native communities. The Senators’ requests included:

• $1.2 billion for Tribal health facilities construction and support;

• $360 million for construction of Tribal justice infrastructure and support;

• $568 million for construction of road and bridge projects on reservations;

• $658 million for construction of Tribal schools and colleges;

• $50 million for housing construction, weatherization, and heating in Native Communities;

• $80 million for Native job training and business development;

• $600 million for water infrastructure development in Tribal lands;

• $4.4 million for energy development on reservations; and

• $50 million to address Tribal land fractionation.

The proposal was submitted by Senators Tim Johnson, D-S.D., Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., Jeff Bingaman, D-N.M., Mark Begich, D-Alaska, Thad Cochran, R-Miss., Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., Jon Tester, D-Mont., Tom Udall, D-N.M., Ron Wyden, D-Oregon, Kay Hagan, D-N.C., Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, Daniel Akaka, D-Hawaii, Roger Wicker, R-Miss., and Chris Dodd, D-Conn.

During his campaign, President Obama stated:

The American Indians I have met across this country will be on my mind each day that I am in the White House. You deserve a president who is committed to being a full partner with you; to respecting you, honoring you and working with you every day. That is the commitment I will make to you as President of the United States.”

On the strength of such pledges, Obama received the endorsement of over 100 Tribal leaders throughout America. The coming weeks and months will reveal the true strength behind these promises, and provide a realistic view of the future for Native communities.