Duwamish Federal Recognition Hearings Underway

Duwamish Tribal Dancers

Duwamish Tribal leaders and Rep. Jim McDermott will testify before the U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources this week, seeking federal recognition for the Tribe. The Duwamish Tribe’s ancestral homeland is located in present-day Seattle, which takes its name from the Tribe’s legendary Chief Si’ahl.

The Duwamish were signatories to the Treaty of Point Elliott in 1855, which guaranteed fishing rights and reservations for all Tribes who were party to the agreement.  However, in 1916 the construction of the ship canal connecting Lake Washington to Puget Sound ultimately forced the Duwamish to leave their traditional territory and move to places like the Muckleshoot and Tulalip reservations.

In the closing hours of President Bill Clinton's administration the Duwamish were granted federal recognition but that decision was reversed by President George Bush's administration. A Bush appointee decided that that the Tribal members no longer exist as a distinct political and social unit, primarily because of what administration officials characterized as a lapse in Tribal government and social cohesion from 1916 to 1925. The Duwamish's approximately 600 members have since sued the U.S. Department of Interior to reverse its ruling and restore federal recognition.

The website for the House Committee on Natural Resources will have a link to video footage of the hearings after their completion.