Salish Sea Canoe Journey Underway

Over 100 family canoes are set to land at the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community on July 25th as participants in the annual Tribal Canoe Journey. The journey is hosted by different communities around the Salish Sea, which stretches from the Puget Sound past Canada's Vancouver Island. Some teams have been paddling since June and their efforts will culminate in a weeklong potlatch. The voyage, inaugurated in 1989, has revitalized intertribal hospitality and allowed for dialogue about common concerns. Canoe journeys of this kind were the principle means of trade and cultural exchange which characterized the rich and water dependent Coast Salish economy. Although primarily a regional event, canoes from as far away as Hawaii and New Zealand are partcipating.



More information on this year's journey is available from the Swinomish here. Each host operates a different web portal for the Journey (next year's host will be Squaxin Island), but a third party blog hosts general information about the events.

White House Announces Next Tribal Nations Conference, 16 December 2010

On Thursday, December 16, 2010, President Obama will host the second White House Tribal Nations Conference. This conference will provide leaders from the 565 federally recognized Tribes the opportunity to interact directly with the President and representatives from the highest levels of the Administration. Each federally recognized Tribe will be invited to send one representative to the conference. 

President Obama's Address To Tribal Nations

 

President Obama's opening address at this week's Tribal Nation's conference can be viewed HERE.

Details On White House Tribal Nations Conference - 5 November 2009

(Dailyyonder.com)

President Barack Obama will host a White House Tribal Nations Conference  on November 5, 2009 from 9 a.m. – 5:30 p.m., with leaders of all 564 federally recognized Tribes invited.  Each federally recognized Tribe can send one representative; it is unclear whether Tribes that do not yet have federal recognition can attend. Indian Country Today reports that the meeting will be held at the Sidney R. Yates Auditorium of the Department of the Interior in Washington D.C..

“I look forward to hearing directly from the leaders in Indian country about what my administration can do to not only meet their needs, but help improve their lives and the lives of their peoples,” Obama said. “This conference will serve as part of the ongoing and important consultation process that I value, and further strengthen the nation-to-nation relationship.”

W. Ron Allen, a member of the executive board of the National Congress of American Indians and Chairman of the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe, said the White House would have been a more impressive setting, but believes it’s important to hold the meeting in an environment that will be conducive to constructive dialogue. Allen emphasized that Tribal leaders expect to be able to present their views and receive specific answers and policy outlines from the President. “We do not want this to be a photo op.”

Allen said many NCAI members want the President to begin showing action on campaign promises to advance self-determination, self-governance and self-reliance for all 564 American Indian and Alaska Native nations. “We are hopeful that he will reaffirm and strengthen his administration’s commitment to the ‘government-to-government’ relationship including clear instruction to all departments and agencies under his executive authority,” Allen said.

MyTribeTV, a Native-owned business in Seattle, will provide online coverage of the conference. The event will be streamed at tribalsummit.mytribetv.com.
 

IRS Allocates First Billion In Tribal Economic Development Bonds

The first billion-dollar tranche of Tribal Economic Development Bonds has now been allocated by the federal government, with the funds being spread over 58 projects for Tribes throughout the country.  The largest dollar allocation for any single project in this financng tranche is $22,565,088.46, which was authorized for over 30 projects, with the remainder receiving smaller authorizations. 

Examples of approved projects in the first financing round include:

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon: Water Infrastructure and Tourism Facility Improvements -- $22,565,088.46

Lummi Nation (Washington): Environmental and Transportation Infrastructure -- $22,565,088.46

Santee Sioux Tribe of Nebraska: Health Facility -- $13,539,053.08

Pueblo of Acoma (New Mexico): Manufacturing Facility -- $8,273,865.77

Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe (Minnesota): Education Facility -- $6,279,393.17

The first tranche of bond authorization was significantly oversubscribed, with the IRS receiving many more applications for projects than the available funding could support.  In an unusual move, rather than reject certain projects completely, the IRS imposed an across-the-board percentage cut to nearly all projects that were approved.  As a result, many projects did not receive the full amount of funding sought, and Tribes may need to revise the scope of work to achieve completion with available funds.

The complete list of Tribal projects authorized for bond issues in this first phase is available here.

Obama To Host National Tribal Nations Conference - 5 November 2009

(Resource Centre for The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples)

President Barack Obama will host a Tribal Nations Conference discussing issues of importance to Native Americans on November 5, the White House announced Monday.  Representatives from each the country’s 564 federally recognized tribes will be invited to participate.


“I look forward to hearing directly from the leaders in Indian Country about what my administration can do to not only meet their needs, but help improve their lives and the lives of their peoples,” Obama said in a written statement.  “This conference will serve as part of the ongoing and important consultation process that I value, and further strengthen the nation-to-nation relationship.”
 

NW Tribal Groups Receive $32 Million from HUD

The U. S. Housing and Urban Development ("HUD") Secretary announced that HUD is awarding more than $32 million in stimulus funds to tribal and native organizations in Alaska, Oregon and Washington state.

Accroding to reports, approximately seven tribal organizations in Washington state will receive nearly $17 million in stimulus funds. Five Alaska Native organizations will receive $13 million, and almost $3 million will go to one tribe in Oregon. The money is to improve housing and stimulate community development.

Nationwide, HUD is awarding 61 grants, totaling $132 million to Native American and Native Alaska communities.

 

MacArthur Foundation Grant Awarded To UW Native American Law Center For Tribal Youth Justice Program

Picture of Ron  Whitener

Professor Ron Whitener - UW Native American Law Center

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation has just announced a $225,000 grant award to the University of Washington’s Native American Law Center, which will fund the Center’s ground-breaking new program to help Tribal communities develop strategies to address the needs of Native American children in state and Tribal juvenile justice systems. The program and grant were conceived and will be managed by Professor Ron Whitener, a Director of the University’s Native American Law Center. Professor Whitener is Assistant Professor of Law and the Director of the Tribal Court Criminal Defense Clinic at the University, is Of Counsel to the law firm of Foster Pepper PLLC in Seattle, and serves as Chief Judge for the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis.

The MacArthur Foundation is an international organization that supports creative people and effective institutions committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. In addition to selecting the MacArthur Fellows, the Foundation works to defend human rights, advance global conservation and security, make cities better places, and understand how technology is affecting children and society.